Foreign Intervention in Africa Panel

https://youtu.be/5vYpKuHctjk Is foreign intervention an aid or a hindrance? In this panel, a wide range of domestic and international development experts discuss issues ranging from NGOs to industrialisation to China. We look into what the future potentially holds for sub-Saharan Africa, and how best millions can be lifted out of poverty. Organised by Helena Holter and … Continue reading Foreign Intervention in Africa Panel

Dr Victoria Baines: Cybersecurity

An Oxford University alumna, for undergraduate study Victoria read classics at Trinity College, she then undertook a Masters study at Oxford and, subsequently, a Roman Literature PhD at the University of Nottingham. According to Secure Computing Magazine, Dr Baines is one of the top 50 women of influence in cyber security. Her previous work experience … Continue reading Dr Victoria Baines: Cybersecurity

Jean Bosco Iyacu: Development Finance — What Does Its Trajectory in Rwanda Indicate for the Future Ahead?

We are currently residing in an era wherein the critique of humanitarianism has become incredibly topical. Whether it be criticisms levied towards foreign aid, or humanitarian missions within the African continent, the subject attracts a great deal of attention. Is there another method that may prove to be fruitful, or provide a beneficial impact? I … Continue reading Jean Bosco Iyacu: Development Finance — What Does Its Trajectory in Rwanda Indicate for the Future Ahead?

31 Years Later, South Africa’s Battle With Apartheid Is Not Yet Won

Photo by John-Paul Henry On 11 February, 31 years ago, Nelson Mandela was liberated from his 27-year toil in prison. This climactic event would mark the beginning of the end for the Apartheid regime. Finally, the National Party that had controlled South African society since 1949 had fallen. It was simply no longer feasible to violently … Continue reading 31 Years Later, South Africa’s Battle With Apartheid Is Not Yet Won

Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

Photo by Ivan Bandura Growing up in a western European country, it is hard to avoid the terms ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ as a framework for viewing the entire world. A brief online search reveals dozens of articles from the Financial Times, the Guardian, the Economist and other news sources using this language, and here at Oxford … Continue reading Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

Modern China-Africa Relations with Lauren Johnston

https://youtu.be/LcV1mGc_Yx4 Jess Wallis (Middle East Events Officer, OxSID) animates the work of Lauren Johnston (research associate, China Institute, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London) based on an interview between her and Leo Bartels (Africa Events Officer, OxSID) which took place in June 2020 covering the increased interaction between China and areas … Continue reading Modern China-Africa Relations with Lauren Johnston

“A Day in the Life of a Nigerian Politician” with Matthew Page

Africa Events Director, Priyan Selvakumar speaks with Matthew Page, Chatham House Associate fellow for the Africa programme. He is also the former US intelligence Nigeria expert as well as former Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Africa on the National Intelligence Council. Since this interview we've seen a major development in the situation in Nigeria as … Continue reading “A Day in the Life of a Nigerian Politician” with Matthew Page

“Challenging the ‘White Gaze of Development’ During COVID-19” with Dr. Robtel Neajai Pailey

In this podcast with Liberian academic, activist and author Dr. Robtel Neajai Pailey, we discuss the intersections between her recently published Al Jazeera English commentary, “Africa does not need saving during this pandemic”, and Development and Change journal article, "De-centring the 'White Gaze' of Development". We use race as a lens of analysis to interrogate … Continue reading “Challenging the ‘White Gaze of Development’ During COVID-19” with Dr. Robtel Neajai Pailey

COVID-19 and the Developing World: An Update

So far the UK has managed to stay within the capacity of its ventilator stock, despite early concerns that it would be insufficient. With over 11,000 of the potentially life saving machines, there is one for roughly every 6,000 people in the UK. By contrast, the New York Times estimates that there are over 20 … Continue reading COVID-19 and the Developing World: An Update

COVID-19: Some Thoughts on the Developing World

As this is my first President's post, hopefully of many, since Mia and I were elected as co-Presidents for next term, I had planned to do a bit of an introduction and an overview of our plans for OxSID over the coming months. But with the  pandemic rapidly entering every aspect of day-to-day life and … Continue reading COVID-19: Some Thoughts on the Developing World