The dark side of the model minority myth for Asian Americans

Over the past few years, Asian Americans have suffered an increase in hate crimes, particularly with the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. How can we reconcile this with the stereotype of Asian Americans being the ‘model minority’? The model minority myth is a racial stereotype imposed upon Asian Americans, often depicting them as a successful … Continue reading The dark side of the model minority myth for Asian Americans

Shell, exploitation and murder: Nigeria’s double-edged attachment to oil

Ken Saro-Wiwa. Before the 1990s, he was perhaps most well-known for being the producer of Basi & Company, an incredibly popular African sitcom which aptly parodied the ‘get rich quick’ mentality and corruption present in oil-rich Nigeria. However, during the 1990s, he was better known for his activism on behalf of his people in Ogoniland, … Continue reading Shell, exploitation and murder: Nigeria’s double-edged attachment to oil

A difficult turn to the left: Peru’s latest election and Castillo’s plans

Pedro Castillo was declared President of Peru on June 28, 2021 Peruvian politics has always been interesting. The country has experienced multiple coups, numerous changes to its constitution, and an abundance of interesting presidents. Peru itself is on the west coast of the South American continent with a population of over thirty million people. In … Continue reading A difficult turn to the left: Peru’s latest election and Castillo’s plans

Afghanistan and the end of the liberal intervention

U.S. Troops withdrew from Afghanistan at the end of summer leading to a Taliban takeover Photo: https://www.army-technology.com/news/us-troop-withdrawal-afghanistan-august/ At the end of summer, pundits, politicians, and the public alike watched the slow encroachment of the Taliban across Afghanistan with horror. Following the withdrawal of the bulk of American troops in most of the country, Western media … Continue reading Afghanistan and the end of the liberal intervention

Redlining: Structural Racism and Climate Injustice in the U.S.

The 1937 Home Owners’ Loan Corporation map of Oakland, California. National Archives and Records Administration 2020 stands out as a year of staggering political turbulence in the United States. With over 340,000 deaths from COVID-19 in 2020 alone, widespread Black Lives Matter protests and a monumental presidential election, it may seem easy to forget the … Continue reading Redlining: Structural Racism and Climate Injustice in the U.S.

31 Years Later, South Africa’s Battle With Apartheid Is Not Yet Won

Photo by John-Paul Henry On 11 February, 31 years ago, Nelson Mandela was liberated from his 27-year toil in prison. This climactic event would mark the beginning of the end for the Apartheid regime. Finally, the National Party that had controlled South African society since 1949 had fallen. It was simply no longer feasible to violently … Continue reading 31 Years Later, South Africa’s Battle With Apartheid Is Not Yet Won

Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

Photo by Ivan Bandura Growing up in a western European country, it is hard to avoid the terms ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ as a framework for viewing the entire world. A brief online search reveals dozens of articles from the Financial Times, the Guardian, the Economist and other news sources using this language, and here at Oxford … Continue reading Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

Educational Inequalities Move Online in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Photo by Jeffrey Hamilton The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed and renewed gross inequalities in global access to education. These inequalities are not new, but the rapid large-scale move to online learning for the majority of the world has exacerbated the inequalities present in education systems across the world pre-pandemic. Even before the pandemic, progress in … Continue reading Educational Inequalities Move Online in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Partisan Pandemic: Public Health in the Age of Trump

Coronavirus has been an inescapable headline for most of this year and stands in a position to dominate discussion for the foreseeable future. Consequently, the analysis of what governments and institutions should have done differently becoming a keen topic of debate. One lesson learnt from the pandemic is already clear: America’s deep fault lines of … Continue reading Partisan Pandemic: Public Health in the Age of Trump