Redlining: Structural Racism and Climate Injustice in the U.S.

The 1937 Home Owners’ Loan Corporation map of Oakland, California. National Archives and Records Administration 2020 stands out as a year of staggering political turbulence in the United States. With over 340,000 deaths from COVID-19 in 2020 alone, widespread Black Lives Matter protests and a monumental presidential election, it may seem easy to forget the … Continue reading Redlining: Structural Racism and Climate Injustice in the U.S.

31 Years Later, South Africa’s Battle With Apartheid Is Not Yet Won

Photo by John-Paul Henry On 11 February, 31 years ago, Nelson Mandela was liberated from his 27-year toil in prison. This climactic event would mark the beginning of the end for the Apartheid regime. Finally, the National Party that had controlled South African society since 1949 had fallen. It was simply no longer feasible to violently … Continue reading 31 Years Later, South Africa’s Battle With Apartheid Is Not Yet Won

Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

Photo by Ivan Bandura Growing up in a western European country, it is hard to avoid the terms ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ as a framework for viewing the entire world. A brief online search reveals dozens of articles from the Financial Times, the Guardian, the Economist and other news sources using this language, and here at Oxford … Continue reading Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

Educational Inequalities Move Online in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Photo by Jeffrey Hamilton The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed and renewed gross inequalities in global access to education. These inequalities are not new, but the rapid large-scale move to online learning for the majority of the world has exacerbated the inequalities present in education systems across the world pre-pandemic. Even before the pandemic, progress in … Continue reading Educational Inequalities Move Online in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Partisan Pandemic: Public Health in the Age of Trump

Coronavirus has been an inescapable headline for most of this year and stands in a position to dominate discussion for the foreseeable future. Consequently, the analysis of what governments and institutions should have done differently becoming a keen topic of debate. One lesson learnt from the pandemic is already clear: America’s deep fault lines of … Continue reading Partisan Pandemic: Public Health in the Age of Trump

If Black Lives Matter, don’t merge DFID with the FCO

Many in the UK suspected the Prime Minister’s somewhat awkward utterance from behind the dispatch box two weeks ago—‘yes of course Black Lives Matter’—of being hollow. That it was belated is indisputable. It jarred with the numerous well-evidenced accusations of racism that many in the media and wider public have laid at Boris Johnson’s door, as … Continue reading If Black Lives Matter, don’t merge DFID with the FCO

Putting the First Last: DFID and International Volunteering

In 2010 David Cameron announced the creation of a UK government funded International Citizen Service (ICS) for 18-25 year olds, designed to fit into the vision of an austerity-driven ‘big society’ as an extension from the well-known National Citizen Service. Since 2010, the programme has now sent over 40,000 volunteers abroad for 12 weeks on … Continue reading Putting the First Last: DFID and International Volunteering

Behind the Protests: Femicide in Mexico

“As the plight of women facing increasing levels of femicide in Mexico disappears from the international news agenda, the question arises of how to implement change...” The scene is familiar: crowds of protestors bearing cardboard signs inscribed with witty slogans that criticise gender inequality and call for further rights or recognition. In many ways, the … Continue reading Behind the Protests: Femicide in Mexico

Two Letters, Two Numbers: Gang Violence in Central America

How the United States’ deportation policies established the street gang violence of today’s Central America  Mural in La 72 Hogar-Refugio para Personas Migrantes, a migrant shelter in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico Jakelin Caal Maquín from Guatemala was seven-years-old when she died on 8 December 2018 in the custody of the United States.  Angie Valeria Ramírez was twenty-three-months-old … Continue reading Two Letters, Two Numbers: Gang Violence in Central America