Betilde Muñoz-Pogossian: Venezuelan Migrants — Tragedy, Resilience and Hope

Since 2017, Venezuela has been in a social, political and economic crisis. Under the Nicolas Maduro regime, the country has experienced extreme hyperinflation and abuses on civilian human rights. The desperate situation has led to food shortages, a lack of health services and a lack of electricity and other basic services across the country. This … Continue reading Betilde Muñoz-Pogossian: Venezuelan Migrants — Tragedy, Resilience and Hope

“Can Development Policies Help Conserve Both Biological and Cultural Diversity?” with Prof. Laura Rival

In what sense can it be said that indigenous people are ecologists and poor people environmentalists? How are continuities and discontinuities between humans, living kinds and other objects in the world established? How have people from different cultures perceived and acted upon the material properties of the biophysical world, and how do different social groups … Continue reading “Can Development Policies Help Conserve Both Biological and Cultural Diversity?” with Prof. Laura Rival

Voluntourism: Gaining More Than You Give

https://youtu.be/fILJNeswgOE Volunteering tourism - "voluntourism" - might be a popular choice among some gap year students, but could it be doing more harm than good?  Based on an interview with Jasper Friedrich, MSc Political Theory student at the University of Oxford, South America Events Officer Jasmine Alexander walks us through the origins and issues of … Continue reading Voluntourism: Gaining More Than You Give

Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

Photo by Ivan Bandura Growing up in a western European country, it is hard to avoid the terms ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ as a framework for viewing the entire world. A brief online search reveals dozens of articles from the Financial Times, the Guardian, the Economist and other news sources using this language, and here at Oxford … Continue reading Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

María-Noel Vaeza: Violence Against Women

Latin America has been one of the worst-hit regions in the world during the COVID-19 pandemic, with over 14 million diagnosed cases. Media images of cardboard coffins and bodies being left in the streets of Guayaquil, Ecuador spread throughout the world. However, the UN has declared there is another pandemic in the region lingering in the shadows – … Continue reading María-Noel Vaeza: Violence Against Women

Dr Julia Zulver: High Risk Feminism

Latin America has a long and rich history of feminist collective action, from the Madres de Plaza de Mayo who campaigned against the Argentinian dictatorship government following the disappearances of family members, to current feminist movements protesting against the lack of action being taken to stop femicide in the region. In contexts of violence and … Continue reading Dr Julia Zulver: High Risk Feminism

“Journalism and Climate Activism” with Jonathan Watts, Global Environment Editor at the Guardian

Join us for a conversation with Jonathan Watts, the Global Environment Editor at The Guardian Newspaper. Jonathan has been a journalist at the Guardian for 24 years, taking up roles such as North Korea visiting reporter, Asia Environment correspondent, East Asia correspondent, Disaster coverage, and Latin America correspondent, writing extensively on environmental degradation, deforestation and … Continue reading “Journalism and Climate Activism” with Jonathan Watts, Global Environment Editor at the Guardian

Prof. Julio Dávila: The Transformative Power of the Cable Car in Medellín, Colombia

Labelled ‘the most dangerous city in the world’ by TIME magazine in 1988, Medellín has since become known as ‘the most innovative’ for its successes in urban development. Once home to Pablo Escobar’s infamous Medellín Cartel, tourists now flock to Colombia’s second- largest city to see its art museums, botanical gardens and most bizarrely, its … Continue reading Prof. Julio Dávila: The Transformative Power of the Cable Car in Medellín, Colombia

Two Letters, Two Numbers: Gang Violence in Central America

How the United States’ deportation policies established the street gang violence of today’s Central America  Mural in La 72 Hogar-Refugio para Personas Migrantes, a migrant shelter in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico Jakelin Caal Maquín from Guatemala was seven-years-old when she died on 8 December 2018 in the custody of the United States.  Angie Valeria Ramírez was twenty-three-months-old … Continue reading Two Letters, Two Numbers: Gang Violence in Central America