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2021 Guide to Careers in International Development

Thinking about a career in international development? There are loads of different areas and sectors that fall under the umbrella of international development, and many different career path possibilities! Here's a brief overview of some of the content in our in-depth (28-page!) career booklet. Members received the guide in their email inboxes, with plenty of … Continue reading 2021 Guide to Careers in International Development

Redlining: Structural Racism and Climate Injustice in the U.S.

The 1937 Home Owners’ Loan Corporation map of Oakland, California. National Archives and Records Administration 2020 stands out as a year of staggering political turbulence in the United States. With over 340,000 deaths from COVID-19 in 2020 alone, widespread Black Lives Matter protests and a monumental presidential election, it may seem easy to forget the … Continue reading Redlining: Structural Racism and Climate Injustice in the U.S.

Prof. Laura Rival: Can Development Policies Help Conserve Both Biological and Cultural Diversity?

In what sense can it be said that indigenous people are ecologists and poor people environmentalists? How are continuities and discontinuities between humans, living kinds and other objects in the world established? How have people from different cultures perceived and acted upon the material properties of the biophysical world, and how do different social groups … Continue reading Prof. Laura Rival: Can Development Policies Help Conserve Both Biological and Cultural Diversity?

31 Years Later, South Africa’s Battle With Apartheid Is Not Yet Won

Photo by John-Paul Henry On 11 February, 31 years ago, Nelson Mandela was liberated from his 27-year toil in prison. This climactic event would mark the beginning of the end for the Apartheid regime. Finally, the National Party that had controlled South African society since 1949 had fallen. It was simply no longer feasible to violently … Continue reading 31 Years Later, South Africa’s Battle With Apartheid Is Not Yet Won

Farmers at War: A Short Introduction to India’s Agricultural Plight

https://youtu.be/dJVC8fYhJf0 Farmers in India have been protesting against three farm acts passed by the Parliament of India in September 2020. But what exactly is going on? Narrated by Talha Islam and illustrated by Pearl Hong, Asia Events Officer, this video gives a short introduction to the origins and ongoing developments in the protests. Narrated by … Continue reading Farmers at War: A Short Introduction to India’s Agricultural Plight

Voluntourism: Gaining More Than You Give

https://youtu.be/fILJNeswgOE Volunteering tourism - "voluntourism" - might be a popular choice among some gap year students, but could it be doing more harm than good?  Based on an interview with Jasper Friedrich, MSc Political Theory student at the University of Oxford, South America Events Officer Jasmine Alexander walks us through the origins and issues of … Continue reading Voluntourism: Gaining More Than You Give

Prof. Bashar Malkawi: Stumbling Blocks to Palestinian Development

In 2008, the unemployment rate in the Gaza Strip reached 71%. The Palestinian economy is endemically weak, in part due to its split geography between Gaza and the West Bank, and its challenges have been exacerbated by political instability, conflict, and the COVID-19 crisis. In this episode, our Middle East Events Officer, Shariq Haidery, speaks … Continue reading Prof. Bashar Malkawi: Stumbling Blocks to Palestinian Development

Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

Photo by Ivan Bandura Growing up in a western European country, it is hard to avoid the terms ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ as a framework for viewing the entire world. A brief online search reveals dozens of articles from the Financial Times, the Guardian, the Economist and other news sources using this language, and here at Oxford … Continue reading Developed and Developing: A Critique of the Way We See the World

María-Noel Vaeza: Violence Against Women

Latin America has been one of the worst-hit regions in the world during the COVID-19 pandemic, with over 14 million diagnosed cases. Media images of cardboard coffins and bodies being left in the streets of Guayaquil, Ecuador spread throughout the world. However, the UN has declared there is another pandemic in the region lingering in the shadows – … Continue reading María-Noel Vaeza: Violence Against Women

Dr Julia Zulver: High Risk Feminism

Latin America has a long and rich history of feminist collective action, from the Madres de Plaza de Mayo who campaigned against the Argentinian dictatorship government following the disappearances of family members, to current feminist movements protesting against the lack of action being taken to stop femicide in the region. In contexts of violence and … Continue reading Dr Julia Zulver: High Risk Feminism